Suggested reading: Why being anti-science is now part of many rural Americans’ identity

[Part of an occasional series of articles I come across and that strike me as being of general interest. Suggestions welcome, using the Contact form on this site.]

by Monica Potts

By September 2021, the scientists and staffers at the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission had gathered enough data to know that the trees in its green-tree reservoirs — a type of hardwood wetland ecosystem — were dying. At Hurricane Lake, a wildlife management area of 17,000 acres, the level of severe illness and death in the timber population was up to 42 percent, especially for certain species of oak, according to a 2014 forest-health assessment. The future of another green-tree reservoir, Bayou Meto, more than 33,000 acres, would look the same if they didn’t act quickly. … (continue at FiveThirtyEight)

2 Comments

  1. Feeding this mistrust of science is now a major industry. And the technology is obvious and freely available – as I recall, most online disinformation about vaccine safety can be traced to a mere dozen sources

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